Frequently Asked Questions

FAQs

Here you'll find answers to common questions our clients ask. Start by selecting one of the links below. If you don’t see what you need – call or contact us online.

  1. At what resolution should I save my photos and graphics?
  2. How do I go about getting an estimate from you?
  3. How long does it take for you to complete my order?
  4. Is white considered a printing color?
  5. Tips on file format setups
  6. What is a "proof"?
  7. What is the Pantone Matching System?
  8. What type of products and services do you provide?
  9. Why do the printed colors look different from the colors on my screen?
  1. At what resolution should I save my photos and graphics?

    Resolution should be set to 300 dpi.

    Pictures and graphics pulled from the internet are often low resolution, typically 72 dpi or 96 dpi. Avoid these graphics, as they will appear pixilated and blocky when printed.

    Also note that you should save all photos in CMYK mode, not RGB mode when possible. Images saved in RGB mode may not print properly. If you are unable to save your image in CYMK mode, please let us know.

  2. How do I go about getting an estimate from you?

    This can be done in one of two ways. Since you are here, we would suggest you use our online estimate request form. Otherwise, the best way to ensure that we get all the information necessary to do an accurate quote, is to give us a call and talk with one of our customer service representatives.

  3. How long does it take for you to complete my order?

    It depends upon the type and size of the job you require. Some jobs can be completed in minutes while others may take days. Let us know when you need your job finished and we'll let you know if it can be accomplished. We go to great lengths to meet your timing demands.

  4. Is white considered a printing color?

    Not typically. Because white is the default color of paper, it is simply recognized as the absence of any ink. However, when using colored paper, white ink may be used if any text or graphic requires it.

  5. Tips on file format setups

    Many layout programs have collecting or packaging functions that will automatically collect your document, fonts, all art including and a report. When possible, it is recommended to use these functions because without any or all of these elements we will be unable to print your project.
    • Enclose all screen fonts and printer fonts
    • Include all placed images
    • Make sure your files are set with proper bleed, trim and safety areas.
    BLEED: All art trimming off the edge MUST be pulled out 1/8” beyond the trim line
    TRIM: This is the guideline where the page will be cut
    SAFETY: All art and text within this safety area will assure that nothing will be trimmed off during the cutting process. A 1/4” guide in from the trim should work fine.

  6. What is a "proof"?

    A proof is a way of ensuring that we have set your type accurately and that everything is positioned according to your requirements. Typically, we will produce a proof, which will be sent to you online to be viewed at your location or it can be printed and delivered to you in person. On multiple color jobs, we will produce a color proof on our color output device to show how the different colors will appear.

  7. What is the Pantone Matching System?

    The Pantone Matching System (PMS) is a color reproduction standard in which colors all across the spectrum are each identified by a unique, independent number. The use of PMS allows us to precisely match colors and maintain color consistency throughout the printing process.

  8. Good question! We are a full service shop and offer a wide range of products and services. For information on what we can offer you, checkout out the Products & Services area in the Customer Service Section of our website.

  9. Why do the printed colors look different from the colors on my screen?

    In short, printers and monitors produce colors in different ways.

    Monitors use the RGB (red, green, blue) color model, which usually supports a wider spectrum of colors. Printers use the CMYK (cyan, magenta, yellow, black) color model, which can reproduce most—but not all—of the colors in the RGB color model. Depending on the equipment used, CMYK generally matches 85–90% of the colors in the RGB model.

    When a color is selected from the RGB model that is out of the range of the CMYK model, the application chooses what it thinks is the closest color that will match. Programs like Adobe Photoshop will allow you to choose which color will be replaced. Others may not.